Last modified: April 17, 2018

History

The International Mathematical Union (IMU) was founded on September 20, 1920, during the International Congress of Mathematicians (ICM) in Strasbourg.
The founding members were 11 countries:

  Belgium, Czechoslovakia, France, Greece, Italy, Japan, Poland, Portugal, Serbia, United Kingdom, United States of America.

  The IMU, in the present formation, was founded in September 1951. The first 10 members of the new IMU were:

  Austria, Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, Japan, Netherlands, Norway, United Kingdom.

  In March 8, 1952, the General Assembly inaugurated the activities of the new IMU with 22 members:

Group Ⅰ: Argentina, Australia, Austria, Cuba, Finland, Greece, Norway, Peru
Group Ⅱ: Canada, Denmark, Netherlands, Pakistan, Spain, Switzerland, Yugoslavia
Group Ⅲ: Belgium
Group Ⅳ: France, Germany, Italy, Japan
Group Ⅴ: United Kingdom, United States of America

  Japan has been a member of Group Ⅴ since 1974.

  The present members of Group Ⅴ are:

  Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, Israel, Italy, Japan, Russia, United Kingdom, United States of America.

  The Committee of Mathematical Science of the Science Council of Japan (SCJ) has served as Japan's Committee for Mathematics of Adhering Organization until 2011.

  In 2012, Japan's National Committee for IMU took shape as a subcommittee of the Committee of Mathematical Science of SCJ
as well as Japan's Committee for Mathematics of Adhering Organization of the IMU.

References

Olli Lehto, "MATHEMATICS Without Borders, A History of the International Mathematical Union," Springer, 1998.
IMU website https://www.mathunion.org/